Demon: A Memoir

Demon: A MemoirDemon: A Memoir by Tosca Lee
Genres: Biblical Fiction, Speculative, Suspense
Published by Howard Books on February 3, 2015
Pages: 352
Also by this author: The Progeny

 

He said Clay would listen to his story, that he would write it down, and then he would publish it. Lucian also told him their stories were closely related, but how could a demon’s story of his fall from grace possibly be related to Clay’s plodding miserable life? Clay, recently divorced, former author turned editor is searching for a meaningful existence. Can answers really be found in the words of a demon? Though initially repulsed, Clay soon finds himself drawn to Lucian’s story—a story that starts before even time began. Through a series of meetings, Clay’s inner author is revived and the story of this demon comes alive in a way that moves from fascination and obsession. But throughout the entire demon’s tale, Clay keeps asking, how does this end and what does this story have to do with me? In a captivating story, Demon: A Memoir, ignites a plethora of ‘what if’ and ‘why’ questions.

I adore Tosca’s books and Demon is the one that started it all.

I first read Demon shortly after its release in 2007. At the time I had no idea how much I would grow to love Tosca’s writing. However, through the years and her three subsequent solo novels, Tosca’s books have become my benchmark by which I judge Biblical fiction. Her blend of fact to fiction and imagination to realism are unmatched among CBA authors. The depth of research in her work combined with thoughtful presentation tends to bring new life to well-known Biblical stories. Yes, I adore Tosca’s books and Demon is the one that started it all.

I’m drawn to unique stories and Demon is certainly unique. The whole idea of an almost sympathetic demon retelling Biblical stories is about as crazy as the idea of a sympathetic Judas. 🙂 Yet we know from scripture that the demons are much more creative and knowledgeable than they’re often given credit for. James 2:19 says, “You believe that there is one God. You do well. Even the demons believe—and tremble!” Tosca presents a thoughtful view of demons. In this book, they’re alive and they have motivations for their actions. They understand their predicament and it gives fire to their actions. The demons in this story are not the stereotypical little devilish looking men with below average intelligence performing silly little acts of annoyances on the average Joe and in the end getting outwitted. Instead Lucian is seen for the cunning creature he is—one who is fully aware of his history and what that means for his future.

The whole idea of an almost sympathetic demon retelling Biblical stories is about as crazy as the idea of a sympathetic Judas.

As with all Tosca’s work, Demon is well researched. It doesn’t dive as deeply into history and Biblical culture as her subsequent novels do, but there is no doubt a lot of time was spent shuffling through different interpretations of scripture in order to present a story that keeps the spirit of Biblical teaching in tact. This must be the hardest part of writing Biblical fiction—balancing between a compelling story and the reader’s preexisting knowledge. Tosca carefully and gracefully inserts new thoughts into long held traditional beliefs. Her stories compel the reader to re-think their ideas without stripping away their beliefs—to see another side to a story that maybe they had never considered before.

Her stories compel the reader to re-think their ideas without stripping away their beliefs—to see another side to a story that maybe they had never considered before.

As I finished Demon for a second time, I was once again impressed by it. It’s intriguing, different, and honest. Through Lucian and ultimately Clay’s story, this book touches on some excellent truths and encourages the reader to reflect on the world, their life, and the precious gift that is available to every human. I highly recommend Demon: A Memoir. It’s a great twist on a story that cannot be heard too many times and an excellent reminder to rejoice in the reason Lucian despises us humans.

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