Faith

FaithFaith by Lyn Cote
Series: Quaker Brides
Genres: Historical Romance
Published by Tyndale Publishing on April 1, 2016
Pages: 584
Also in this series: Blessing
Also by this author: Blessing

 

About Faith (from the backcover):
The Civil War battlefield is the last place Quakeress Faith Cathwell thought she’d find herself. But with a gift for nursing, Faith seizes this opportunity to join the fight for abolition—and to search for Shiloh, a freeborn childhood friend who was kidnapped and sold south by unscrupulous slave catchers.

Knowing it’s much too dangerous for her to search enemy territory alone, Faith enlists the help of Colonel Devlin Knight, who is indebted to her for saving his cousin’s life. A career soldier, Dev is committed to the preservation of the Union but conflicted about freeing his own slave and confidant, who plans to enlist as soon as Dev gives him manumission papers.

Blazing a trail east with the rest of Grant’s army, Dev and Faith fight their personal battles—and a growing attraction to each other. When beliefs clash and passions flare, they quickly find that the only thing more dangerous than the war surrounding them is the battle within their hearts.

Having read the previous two novels in the Quaker Brides series, I’ve come to appreciate how Lyn uses her books to share stories of strong women from different points and situations in history. In Faith readers follow the character Faith in the thick of the Civil War as she cares for the wounded Union soldiers after battle. Once again, I admired how Lyn portrays her character – not only is Faith already a bit of an anomaly due to being a Quakeress, she has also chosen to step out in a profession that was not held in high regard, particularly for women, at the time.

Having read the previous two novels in the Quaker Brides series, I’ve come to appreciate how Lyn uses her books to share stories of strong women from different points and situations in history.

One thing that didn’t quite work for me was the pacing. The plot is first focused on Faith and Honoree trying to find a beloved friend and family member, Shiloh, but as the story progresses, the war scenes and romance takes center stage. In one way, it does highlight the idea that sometimes our plans and desires don’t always work out the way we want – nor are we always as capable as we think we are. So, for that, I appreciated the deviation; however, I think had I not thought that was the primary focus of the plot, I may have not minded the shift in focus.

One thing that didn’t quite work for me was the pacing.

The glimpse into what it may have been like during battle for the soldiers and the aftermath for those tending the wounded is fascinating. I also liked the details of how life might have been like living in the camp; Lyn highlighted the fact that it was almost like a small town in and of itself, with etiquettes and customs unique to the Army. Throughout these harrowing times, the story also focuses on the growing feelings between Faith and Devlin, a Colonel in the Union Army. While it may have been unusual for them to associate with one another, Lyn made it realistic due to the circumstances of the story, especially in regards to both Faith’s and Devlin’s backgrounds.

The glimpse into what it may have been like during battle for the soldiers and the aftermath for those tending the wounded is fascinating.

Honoree, who is like a sister to Faith and also a nurse, was one of my favorite secondary characters. She is a little prickly and sassy – which was what I loved about her – but also a loyal friend to Faith. There’s just something so endearing about a well-portrayed friendship. In contrast to this is the relationship between Devlin and his manservant, Armstrong, who Devlin has promised to free upon his fortieth birthday. Though against slavery, Devlin has never freed Armstrong, who was “given” to him by a pro-slavery family member. Having come to depend upon Armstrong from a very young age, Devlin has to fight his own selfish natures, and also worry about Armstrong’s well-being. I liked the contrast between the two relationships and thought it was an interesting and realistic way to portray the issue of slavery that seemed a highly likely attitude of many leading up to and during the war.

The ending gives a peek into the lives of characters from previous books, which I always appreciate. I enjoyed this third offering in the Quaker Brides series, and I recommend it to readers who enjoy a sweet historical romance, and who might be interested in a story that features a heroine serving in a non-traditional role.

2 Comments

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *