Fury

FuryFury by Steven James
Series: Blur Trilogy
Genres: Speculative, Suspense, Thriller, Young Adult
Published by Skyscape on April 28, 2015
Pages: 432
Also by this author: The Queen, Opening Moves, The King, Checkmate, Every Crooked Path

 

When sixteen year old Daniel Byers wakes up in a mental hospital, he has no recollection of how he got there. The recurring question that police and doctors keep asking is, “Where is your dad?” As he talks to investigators and his girlfriend, Nicole, he begins to piece together a picture of what happened between what he can remember and the present. From all accounts, Daniel was found covered in his (now missing) dad’s blood. Given that a few days prior, his hallucinations returned and combined with some other chilling events, Daniel isn’t completely convinced he’s innocent of a crime. However, regardless of his guilt or innocence, Daniel believes he must piece together the messages from his visions and buried memories in his past in order to find his dad. As is expected of a Steven James novel, Fury is a fast-paced adventure with engaging characters and great suspense that leaves the reader impatiently waiting for the final book in the series.

As is expected of a Steven James novel, Fury is a fast-paced adventure with engaging characters and great suspense that leaves the reader impatiently waiting for the final book in the series.

I very much enjoyed Blur, the first book in the Blur trilogy. However, I thought the mystery was a little easy to solve, which is quite unusual for this author. But the story was very enjoyable and the characters were fun to follow. As a result, I have definitely been looking forward to this second book, Fury. I was not at all disappointed with this one. Fury is less of a whodunit mystery and more of a straight out thriller. The mystery element lies in deciphering Daniel’s memories and blurs rather than figuring out who is responsible. As a result, the story feels fresh and the characters get to show more of their personality in a very natural progression.

One of the best parts of this series so far has been the relationship between Dan and his dad.

As a parent of teens, I’m always on the look out for books that are not only appropriate content wise, but also reflect strong family structures. One of the best parts of this series so far has been the relationship between Dan and his dad. Dan is not the perfect teen nor is his dad the perfect parent, but there is a respect that runs both ways. From a parental point of view, it’s nice to see adults treated with respect and intelligence rather than close-minded simpletons. It is also nice to see Dan’s mom brought more into this story. Steven does a very nice job of introducing her to the reader so that they are less likely to hold her past actions against her. This approach makes her future presence in this series one I look forward to.

Often times teens in YA books act stupid. They make dumb decisions that seem based more on impulse than any true logic. While this is a stereotype for a reason, it’s refreshing to see teens make questionable decisions based on courage rather than foolishness. Daniel and his friends do not always make the most intelligent decisions, but their actions have purpose that progresses the plot and their character development.

As is always the case, Steven includes some great food for thought. The main spiritual theme in this book is one I’ve seen in his Patrick Bowers series. However, the presentation is different and will resonant well with the intended audience. Furthermore, this is a theme that I don’t believe can be over-explored; it hits on a part of human nature that everyone struggles with.

Fury once again highlights Steven James’ master storytelling capabilities.

Fury once again highlights Steven James’ master storytelling capabilities. It has a great plot, excellent pacing, and characters the reader can really invest their time in. The ending is not a complete cliffhanger, but it’s certainly far from being resolved. I look forward to finding out how the Blur trilogy ends next year.

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