Passenger

PassengerPassenger by Alexandra Bracken
Genres: Young Adult
Published by Disney-Hyperion on January 5, 2016
Pages: 496

 

About Passenger (from the back cover):
In one devastating night, violin prodigy Etta Spencer loses everything she knows and loves. Thrust into an unfamiliar world by a stranger with a dangerous agenda, Etta is certain of only one thing: she has traveled not just miles, but years from home. And she’s inherited a legacy she knows nothing about from a family whose existence she’s never heard of. Until now.

Nicholas Carter is content with his life at sea, free from the Ironwoods-a powerful family in the Colonies-and the servitude he’s known at their hands. But with the arrival of an unusual passenger on his ship comes the insistent pull of the past that he can’t escape and the family that won’t let him go so easily. Now the Ironwoods are searching for a stolen object of untold value, one they believe only Etta, his passenger, can find. In order to protect her, Nick must ensure she brings it back to them-whether she wants to or not. 
Together, Etta and Nicholas embark on a perilous journey across centuries and continents, piecing together clues left behind by the traveler who will do anything to keep the object out of the Ironwoods’ grasp. But as they get closer to the truth of their search, and the deadly game the Ironwoods are playing, treacherous forces threaten to separate Etta not only from Nicholas but from her path home forever.

Right off the bat, Passenger by Alexandra Backen: reminded me of the book, Seeker by Arwen Elys Dayton. Both having to do with hidden family secrets, time travel, and romance, but I felt the romantic storyline played out much smoother in Passenger. Etta and Nicolas’ personalities were easier to root for too, and anytime a pirate is used for the greater good, things tend to be a bit adventurous. And they were.

The fact that Etta is a violinist—so not your typical YA heroine trait, and how musical notes could open the time travel passengers really made this story it’s own.

The fact that Etta is a violinist—so not your typical YA heroine trait, and how musical notes could open the time travel passengers really made this story it’s own. The author also used Nicholas’s heritage to show racism throughout the generations. It wasn’t done in a soapbox way, but felt true to the story and yet it was like a beacon shouting: ‘Reader please don’t let history repeat itself.’

Even though the story started and ended very strongly, it slowed down a bit in the middle, but all in all well worth the read.

Definitely a PG-13 label, where a bedroom scene wasn’t used, but the reader was aware of what happened off-screen. Language was a common by-product of just about any character that became angry. I would have liked for the author to have been a little more imaginative when trying to show a character’s mood than to simply use foul language. Several different religions were referenced throughout the story as Etta and Nicholas traveled from country to country. Ones that were true to the customs of each time, however it felt almost like the author wanted to make sure a variety was used only so no one might find offense.

Highly recommended for fans of Seeker, the TimeShifters Series by Jess Evander, and those who enjoyed the 39 Clues books.

Passenger isn’t a story to try and figure out clues of where the next place Etta and Nicolas needed to travel next, but rather it focused on their budding relationship and why the time travel families were hostile to each another. Even though the story started and ended very strongly, it slowed down a bit in the middle, but all in all well worth the read.

Highly recommended for fans of Seeker, the TimeShifters series by Jess Evander, and those who enjoyed the 39 Clues books. And I will be keeping the next book in this series on my TBR list.

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