The Goodbye Bride

The Goodbye BrideThe Goodbye Bride by Denise Hunter
Series: Summer Harbor
Genres: Contemporary Romance
Published by Thomas Nelson on March 8, 2016
Pages: 336

 

About The Goodbye Bride (from the back cover):
She only remembers loving him. But he can’t forget the way she left.

Lucy Lovett can’t remember the last seven months of her life. She doesn’t remember leaving her fiancé Zac Callahan weeks before their wedding or moving to Portland, Maine. And she sure doesn’t remember getting engaged to another man. All she remembers is loving Zac more than life itself.

Zac was just beginning to get his life back on track after Lucy left him with no explanation. And now she’s back—vulnerable, homeless, and still in love with him. Has he been given a second chance with the only woman who stirs his passion and haunts his dreams?

Lucy knows she must unlock those missing months and discover why she threw everything away. And Zac knows that if he follows his heart he’ll win back the love of his life—but if Lucy’s memory returns, his would-be bride might say goodbye forever.

 

The cover is gorgeous.

The title is perfect.

The journey of love and forgiveness is heart-happy-preciousness. (Totally a word!)

The first book I ever read of Denise Hunter’s was Falling Like Snowflakes, the first book in A Summer Harbor series. (I know. I know. Where have I been hiding?) Obviously, it was good because it lead me straight into reading the next book in the series: The Goodbye Bride.

The journey of love and forgiveness is heart-happy-preciousness.

Poor Lucy. I really liked the girl. She was sweet and southern, and even when I was probably not supposed to like her, I couldn’t help but be on her side. It wasn’t her fault that she couldn’t remember the past seven months. And she acted like a champ when everyone in the small town practically dismissed her because she had left the wonderful Zac Calhoun.

Forgiveness oozed off the ending chapters. Not in a cheesy way, but in a way that gave the characters more depth.

Zac, who was indeed wonderful, was stuck somewhere between happiness and torture—not literally, of course. A part of him was thrilled the girl he never stopped loving was not only back in his life, but back in his life AND still in love with him. Except he also hated it. She had left right before their wedding, breaking his heart. He never found out the reasons, and perhaps worse, she didn’t remember why either. His inner struggle, deciding whether to open his guarded heart again, made me feel for the guy. I didn’t want him to get his heart crushed again either. His natural ‘hero’ ability and desire to protect Lucy despite the past was totally swoon worthy material.

This second book wasn’t as suspenseful as the previous book, but it still held that element.

Forgiveness oozed off the ending chapters. Not in a cheesy way, but in a way that gave the characters more depth. The build up to Lucy’s recovered memory was paced perfectly. I always, always enjoy a good twist in a book, and that’s what I’m calling that section of Lucy and Zac’s story. Yes, it’s a smaller size, but just as productive. In fact it’s definitely my favorite part of The Goodbye bride. A close second moment was the epilogue. It made it extremely difficult to say goodbye to the characters.

I always, always enjoy a good twist in a book.

The Goodbye Bride can be enjoyed as a standalone, but I promise the Callahan brothers are well worth starting from the beginning, and the best news is book three comes out in September.

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