The Lost Prophet

The Lost ProphetThe Lost Prophet by James B. McPike
Series: Ramsey Series
Genres: Crime, Suspense
Published by CreateSpace on April 16, 2015
Pages: 340

 

About The Lost Prophet (from the back cover):
After one of the Holy Land’s most sacred monuments is destroyed, the Ministry has to turn to their most prolific investigator to solve the case: Vince Ramsey. He soon discovers that they are facing a graver threat than any of them could’ve imagined. It seems the enemy’s primary objective is to abolish the remains of biblical prophets, and wipe out their very existence from history. With all-out war on the brink in the Middle East, Ramsey must stop the person responsible before he strikes again. Following clues through ancient landscapes rich with peril and religious undertones, he eventually is led to a remote desert inside Jordan where Deuteronomy 34:6 states: “God buried Moses…but no man knows of his sepulcher unto this day.” Backed by a foreign superpower—the enemy has every intention of uncovering the elusive burial place. But can Ramsey prevent another horrific travesty with worldwide repercussions from happening…or will the villain accomplish his final blasphemous act?

This is the second book of a series featuring Vince Ramsey, an Israeli counter-intelligence operative as the main character. I had not read the previous book prior to picking up The Lost Prophet. However, I was able to quickly ascertain the background of the character and didn’t feel lost or as if I was missing details in that omission. A number of references were made to the history between April and Vince, which, while not integral to the story, did pique my curiosity as to what the first book would hold.

The story line in this book is quite intriguing. A villain who purposefully destroys some of the most iconic places in the Middle East definitely grabs your attention.

The story line in this book is quite intriguing. A villain who purposefully destroys some of the most iconic places in the Middle East definitely grabs your attention. The cat and mouse game that ensues between villain Markovich and our hero Ramsey leads to a chase through sites and historical context that any history buff will love. Unfortunately, some of it gets a little muddled in the back and forth as the author tells the story in the third person, jumping back and forth between the two characters.

For those looking for a good read in the crime/suspense category this definitely fits the bill. However, if you are looking for a book that fills those requirements without being secular in nature, this book is not for you.

For those leaning toward the more conservative side the first issue you should be aware of is language. There are quite a lot of expletives laced throughout the book. At first, it seemed as though language was only being used in times of high suspense, but upon further reading they are woven throughout the book and they are graphic. The language does not enhance the storyline, so some readers may be able to glide right over them with little interruption. For others, their usage could be quite distracting.

For those looking for a good read in the crime/suspense category this definitely fits the bill.

Morality also runs a little loose in this book. There are numerous references to April and Vince’s sexual relationship outside of marriage. Thankfully, nothing is explicitly graphic, so most readers again can probably glance over them without missing the storyline. What shocked me however, was the seeming lack of a moral compass by the main character Vince Ramsey. The villain, Markovich, clearly has few, if any, morals. But that I expect. He’s a villain. Vince, however, seems to have no hesitation and gives little thought to the people he kills or his condemnation of the villain. There is no hesitation or reproach in his drive to end Markovich’s life. No mercy is shown during the final showdown and to describe the final scene as brutal would be an understatement. This outlook reflects a worldly outlook of good guy kills bad guy. If you are looking for a redemption story, it isn’t here.

Morality also runs a little loose in this book.

The only other caveat I would have with this book are the Biblical references. Be wary, the references are often taken out of context and in one instance ancillary books are referenced. The references are from the Old Testament and are more historical in nature, so don’t get bogged down by them, just be aware.

The final chapters deal heavily in mysticism, angels, demons and gods worshipped by people during Biblical times. The dialogue gets a bit scrambled as the god speaks. It doesn’t quite mesh with the narrative describing this god in all his glory or his infinite knowledge. The interaction between the archangel and “the fallen angel” is also lacking. If the author was going for humor here, it didn’t translate.

Overall, The Lost Prophet is an acceptable read. I didn’t find it a page-turner and one I just couldn’t put down. With the exception of the few cautions I have outlined, it did have a good storyline. I’d put it in the “read it if you have time” category, but not the “make time” category.

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