The Pattern Artist

The Pattern ArtistThe Pattern Artist by Nancy Moser
Genres: Historical Romance
Published by Shiloh Run Press on December 1, 2016
Pages: 305

 

Publisher’s Summary

English housemaid Annie Wood arrives in New York in 1911. On her own for the first time working as a Macy’s sewing department clerk, Annie catches the eye of a salesman at the Butterick Pattern Company. Through determination, hard work, and God’s leading, Annie discovers a hidden gift: she is a talented fashion designer—an artist of the highest degree. As she runs from ghosts of the past and focuses on the future, Annie enters a creative world that takes her to the fashion houses of Paris and into a life of adventure, purpose, and love.

One thing I have come to appreciate from Nancy Moser’s novels is the exquisite historical detail that she includes in her story. That is no less true for The Pattern Artist. It is full of details about life in New York of the early 1900’s and specifically what it would have been like to work at Macy’s as a shop girl, as well as Butterrick Pattern Compnay as a pattern artist and designer. It really highlighted a different world and a view that feels a bit unreal compared to now. Even the idea of a department story like Macy’s was considered a luxury and a novelty that it just doesn’t hold now. I enjoyed that aspect of the novel, as well as the details of sewing and clothing design of the times most desirable fashions.

One thing I have come to appreciate from Nancy Moser’s novels is the exquisite historical detail that she includes in her story.

Annie Wood has one of those indomitable spirits, making her a character that you hope will succeed. Her life changes drastically as the story progresses, and she is realistically shaken by all that happens, while simultaneously pleased and grateful for the good things that happen to her. I loved these things about her, and yet, there were some things I didn’t love about the story as a whole. The plot moves a bit slowly and seems to stall out on this one plot point, which for me, does nothing to propel what I considered to be the real story. I adjusted my expectations a bit once I realized this was going to take up a significant portion of the story, but it definitely wasn’t what I wished for the story’s focus. Once that aspect of the plot was more or less out of the way, I fell back into the story and was more engaged for the remainder of the story.

Annie Wood has one of those indomitable spirits, making her a character that you hope will succeed.

Overall, there was a sort of juvenile feeling to this, as though it was for a younger audience. That’s not a bad thing, just another expectation that I did not have and had to adjust. I was left with a desire of wanting more, as many of the situations just seemed to scratch the surface of the characters’ development. Despite the juvenile feeling of Annie’s character and some aspects of the story, I did appreciate that Annie possesses an overall positive outlook and willingness to rise above her current situation.

I was left with a desire of wanting more, as many of the situations just seemed to scratch the surface of the characters’ development.

While The Pattern Artist is definitely not my favorite of the Nancy Moser novels that I’ve read thus far, it was an enjoyable read that touches on an intriguing time period and incorporates engaging historical details.

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