Wife for the Weekend

Wife for the WeekendWife for the Weekend by Ophelia London
Series: Sugar City
Genres: Contemporary Romance
Published by Entangled Bliss on March 14, 20016
Pages: 250

 

About Wife for the Weekend (from the back cover):

When bad weather closes the airport, free-spirited Jules Bloom finds herself stuck with the admittedly hot but total suit Dexter Elliott. One night and one large pitcher of “Vegas Sunrise” later, Jules wakes up in a hotel bed with Dexter, a vicious hangover…and a wedding ring.

Determined not to ruin his brother’s wedding, Dexter strikes a deal with the frustratingly gorgeous Jules to continue their quickie marriage through the weekend. Only she keeps getting under his skin in unexpected ways.

Jules has her own reasons for staying married to Dex but they seem less important with each exaggerated touch and staged kiss. But one marriage, one major secret, and two complete opposites don’t add up to a happily ever after…

I have mixed feelings about this cute and sweet romance from Ophelia London and Entangled Bliss. On the one hand, it is – as already stated – cute and sweet and romantic. On the other hand, I just couldn’t relate to Jules at all. Dexter? Now, he completely reminded me of Ryan Reynolds in The Proposal and that’s never a bad thing.

Dexter? Now, he completely reminded me of Ryan Reynolds in The Proposal and that’s never a bad thing.

The setup – a “what were we thinking” marriage in Vegas – takes a couple of interesting twists to set it apart from others in the genre.  For starters, they’ve vaguely known each other for years without really noticing the other person. (In fact, Jules used to date Dexter’s brother who happens to be getting married too, but that’s neither here nor there at the moment.) In addition, Dexter and Jules each have their own reasons for wanting to temporarily stay married – a sibling bet and some pretty hefty cash, in Dexter’s case, and a cherished inheritance in Jules’.  Otherwise, the plot remains somewhat predictable… which, in chick lit, is in general perfectly okay.

I would have loved more time devoted to the well-written banter.

Besides my lack of connection with Jules, a couple more things kept me from fully embracing this story. As much as I did enjoy the romance and the progression of their relationship, it lacked the character development I was hoping to see. There is some, particularly in Dexter’s case, but I would have enjoyed more focus on this aspect of their relationship growth.  Another hesitation I have in recommending this book is the high level of sensuality.  While certain … um…  marital activities …  never cross over into explicit, a vast majority of the book deals with nudity or wanting to participate in said marital activities or implication of participating in said marital activities or discussing the aftermath of said marital activities or … I think you get my drift.  Even though Entangled Bliss markets Wife for the Weekend as a “sweet read”, I felt like the idea of sex consumed most of the plot.

Instead of “all the sex”, as Chandler Bing once cringingly coined in an episode of Friends, I would have loved more time devoted to the well-written banter.  Picture Sandra Bullock and Ryan Reynolds from The Proposal, and you get a pretty good sense of the back-and-forth between Jules and Dexter.  Except… substitute Phoebe Buffay instead of Sandra Bullock for Jules.  But, no matter who is in each role in my head, the fact remains that I could hear their voices because London is skilled at writing chemistry and banter.  The dialogue and asides and – especially – the rehearsal party scene all made me smile and drew a few chuckles from me too.

In short, Wife for the Weekend is a cute, light read – nothing heavy, but also nothing terribly redemptive either.

In short, Wife for the Weekend is a cute, light read – nothing heavy, but also nothing terribly redemptive either.  Its theme, its characters, its dialogue will certainly appeal to chick flick fans.  However, if you’re looking for a story with a similar plot (the accidental Vegas marriage), great humor, a swoon-worthy hero, and a wonderfully likable heroine, as well as character growth and redemption … might I recommend Becky Wade’s Meant to be Mine instead?

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